In the months and weeks leading up to the birth of your baby you’ll have a lot on your mind. It can feel like a very exciting and also very stressful time trying to get everything ready and tie up loose ends before your baby arrives. Luckily, it is a natural process that you and your baby already know how to do – not that there are never frustrations that come up along the way. The important thing to remember is that our bodies are meant to make milk, and even though every mother and baby have different experiences, breastfeeding is a completely normal process.

Three Tips for How to Prepare for Breastfeeding Success:

  • Tell everyone about your plan to breastfeed, especially your medical support staff at the hospital or birth center.
  • Look up the schedule for a local breastfeeding support group and clear your calendar during the meet up times after your due date. Lactation groups are extremely beneficial for moms getting a handle on breastfeeding a new baby.
  • Get recommendations for a lactation consultant before you need one. You may decided to call on a lactation consultant during the first few weeks of establishing breastfeeding if you experience any difficulties with latching or milk supply.

Unless your baby is in need of expressed milk right after delivery, you won’t need your breast pump until you begin storing milk in preparation to return to work or using it while you are away from the baby. Don’t use it before delivery as it can cause you to go into labor prematurely.


Information provided in blogs should not be used as a substitute for medical care or consultation.



Kathleen Kendall-Tackett

About the Author

Contributing to this blog is Dr. Kendall-Tackett, PhD, IBCLC and FAPA, and award-winning health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. She specializes in women's health research including breastfeeding, depression, and trauma, and has authored more than 420 articles or chapters, and is author or editor of 35 books.

Learn more about Kathleen!

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