One of the biggest concerns for new moms after having a baby is whether or not the transition back to work will go smoothly. The key to a successful transition is to create a plan and to find the breastfeeding cheerleaders in your life. Kathleen Kendall-Tackett recommends this template to address the major considerations you will encounter during the transition back to work. You can also find a helpful downloadable Back To Work Plan here.

This includes a list of supplies to take with you, what to provide your baby’s caregiver, how to set up a pumping space at work, and how to talk to your employer about it. If you are aware of the potential obstacles, you will be able to navigate around them more easily when they pop up.

Two Tips for Back to Work Breastfeeding:

  • Find Your Breastfeeding Cheerleaders

    These people are the ones that keep your spirits up when you’re feeling overwhelmed or are doubting your ability to continue nursing. They can be family, friends, other moms at a breastfeeding support group, a lactation consultant, or your doctor. Have their contact information ready in the event that you need a pep talk.

  • Don’t Plan to Pump in a Bathroom

    The default pumping location used to be bathrooms, however, there are laws now that require companies to provide a private nursing space for mothers that isn’t a bathroom. While there are a few exceptions to the law, it is not too much to ask for a space that is NOT the bathroom. If your employer requests that you keep your pumping in the restrooms, kindly let them know that it is not standard practice anymore.


  • Information provided in blogs should not be used as a substitute for medical care or consultation.


    ”Kathleen

    About the Author

    Contributing to this blog is Dr. Kendall-Tackett, PhD, IBCLC and FAPA, and award-winning health psychologist and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. She specializes in women's health research including breastfeeding, depression, and trauma, and has authored more than 420 articles or chapters, and is author or editor of 35 books.

    Learn more about Kathleen!

    Additional Resources